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In March, the Center for Academic Research & Training in Anthropogeny hosted a conference on the “Evolutionary Origins of Art and Aesthetics”. The list of speakers was pretty impressive. Luckily, the lectures were taped and are now available on You Tube. Here is a video with lectures by Antonio Damasio on emotion, Helen Fisher on love, and Isabelle Peretz on music. I will probably post some of the other talks at a later point.

-Martin

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bloggingheadstv.jpgMichael Gazzaniga is one of the directors of a very interesting new neuroethics project, The Law & Neuroscience Project, supported finacially by The MacArthur Fondation. The aim of the project is to convene experts from a number of disciplines (neuroscience, law, philosophy, etc.) to discuss how our understanding of the brain impacts – or, perhaps, should impact – our current legal system. It sounds like a very interesting project, and I think we here at BrainEthics will try to investigate what comes out of it as the project progresses.

In the meantime, go to bloggingheads.tv and watch Carl Zimmer interview Mike Gazzaniga about the project. As always, Zimmer asks very good and thoughtful questions.

-Martin

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icon_psychoanalysis.jpgToday we received this nice email from Paul Watson at Psychology Press. They are launching a new site for cognitive neuroscience news. I’ll let the email speak for itself:

Hi Martin & Thomas

Just a quick note to say we’ve recently launched a new Cognitive Neuroscience Arena which I think might be of interest to you two.

(We = Psychology Press, publishers of the journal Social Neuroscience, which you commented on in your blog post on July 4th)

We’ve included a link to the Brain Ethics blog on our blogs page.

As well as all our relevant books and journals, we’ve included a few other features that may be of interest to you and your readers:

1. The whole of the first chapter of our textbook “The Student’s Guide to Cognitive Neuroscience” is available to read free online (we think it’s a great introduction to the subject)

2. In a similar vein, we’ve also got the introductory article from our journal Social Neuroscience, also available to read free online (this is the same one which is on the Social Neuroscience journal website which you posted about).

3. There’s also a page of links to the latest Cognitive Neuroscience blog posts (courtesy of Technorati)

4. An a nifty GoogleMap showing forthcoming Cogntitive Neuroscience conferences (only 3 we know of at time of writing) at http://www.cognitiveneurosciencearena.com/resources/conferences.asp

And numerous other features including an RSS feed of our latest Cogntive Neuroscience books.

I’ve sent the link to your blog to Rose Allet who runs the marketing for the Social Neuroscience journal here at Psychology Press, so she may also email you and will probably send the URL of your blog to the editors of Social Neuroscience so they can see your comments).

If you’ve got any questions, feel free to drop me a line.

Regards,

Paul Watson

———————————————————————————-
Paul Watson, Senior E-Marketing Executive
Psychology Press

http://www.psypress.co.uk
http://www.routledgementalhealth.co.uk

-Thomas

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