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Archive for the ‘social neuroscience’ Category

social-neuroscience.jpgThe new issue (number 3-4, September-December 2006) of Social Neuroscience is a hefty double issue tome dedicated to the topic of Theory of Mind. It contains 20 papers by several of the leaders in the field, and is edited by Rebecca Saxe and Simon Baron-Cohen. One of the reasons for the enduring interest in ToM is that, in contrast to other capacities for social reasoning – for instance, the ability to represent facial features or the intentional motion of conspecifics’ bodies – the ability to reason about the contents of mental states may be an unique human ability (see, e.g., [1]). Recently, through fMRI research, ToM has been linked to a specific part of the human brain: the right temporo-parietal junction.

Reference

[1] Saxe, R. (2006): Uniquely human social cognition. Current Opinion in Neurobiology 16: 1-5.

-Martin

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ubuntu-logo.pngSuffering from a full computer breakdown, my IBM Thinkpad has become sucpiciously reluctant to re-install Windows. Instead, I’m now running Ubuntu linux. For the most part it is not just comparable to Windows, in many respects it’s even better.

So what does this computer havoc have to do with the brain, or ethics at all?

Ubuntu is a totally free computer software, a fully operational operative system that replaces Windows fully. As in the core spirit of the linux movement, everything is free. So who benefits — besides myself — from this genuine altruism? I’m actually quite puzzled as to how I could explain that someone would spend a lot of their time making software without charging me anything for it. (more…)

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mysticfigure.jpgA new report in Nature demonstrates that electrical stimulation of the temporoparietal junction in the brain induces a sensation of the presence of an illusory “shadowy person”. One of the hallmarks of certain forms of schizophrenia is just this phenomenon: the eery feeling of someone’s presence. Now, it has been demonstrated in a study using electrical brain activation in a person without a history of psychiatric problems.

Basically, the study was performed on a subject that was at the preoperative stage of surgery for epilepsy. A normal procedure is to anaesthesize the patient before opening the skull, and then wake the patient up before stimulating the brain. The aim of such stimulation is to find the location of epilepsy onset, as well as to stimulate the areas surrounding this region, in order to map functionally important regions (e.g. language that are important in language). Such preoperative procedures are known to lead to a better surgical sensitivity, i.e. the ability to remove all of the abnormal tissue, and a higher surgical selectivity, i.e. avoding removal of normal tissue. In this way, neurosurgeons often evoke a number of sensations and behaviours in patients, including the disruption of speech, visual phosphenes, and memory deficits.

In the present case, the neurosurgeons found that electrical stimulation lead to a feeling of the presence of another person. Moreover, the patient reported that this figure was taking the same posture as herself, and even sometimes interfering with a task she was performing:

When stimulated (…) the patient had the impression that somebody was behind her. Further stimulation induced the same experience, with the patient describing the “person” as young and of indeterminate sex, a “shadow” who did not speak or move, and whose position beneath her back was identical to her own (“He is behind me, almost at my body, but I do not feel it”). (…) Further stimulations [other location] were applied while the seated patient performed a naming (language-testing) task using a card held in her right hand: she again reported the presence of the sitting “person”, this time displaced behind her to her right and attempting to interfere with the execution of her task (“He wants to take the card”; “He doesn’t want me to read”).

Stimulation of the temporoparietal junction (shown with an arrow in the image above) thus seems to distort some kind of body image, or maybe even efference copy (PDF) of self-actions. Both functions that are dramatically affected in abnormal brain states following certain kinds of delusional schizoprenia and brain injury.

The finding also nicely relates to the Swiss group’s earlier study combining EEG, TMS and the study of an epilepsy patient, where it was found that disruption of the temporoparietal junction function led to an “impaired mental transformation of one’s own body”. Here, the researchers concluded that:

the [temporoparietal junction, TPJ] is a crucial structure for the conscious experience of the normal self, mediating spatial unity of self and body, and also suggest that impaired processing at the TPJ may lead to pathological selves such as [out-of-body experience].

Here is the full story:

Induction of an illusory shadow person
By Arzy et al
Nature 443, 287

Stimulation of a site on the brain’s left hemisphere prompts the creepy feeling that somebody is close by.

The strange sensation that somebody is nearby when no one is actually present has been described by psychiatric and neurological patients, as well as by healthy subjects, but it is not understood how the illusion is triggered by the brain1, 2. Here we describe the repeated induction of this sensation in a patient who was undergoing presurgical evaluation for epilepsy treatment, as a result of focal electrical stimulation of the left temporoparietal junction: the illusory person closely ‘shadowed’ changes in the patient’s body position and posture. These perceptions may have been due to a disturbance in the multisensory processing of body and self at the temporoparietal junction.
Top of page

1. Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne 1015, Switzerland
2. Presurgical Epilepsy Evaluation Unit, University Hospital, Geneva 1211, Switzerland
3. Department of Neurology, University Hospital, Geneva 1211, Switzerland
4. Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Dartmouth College, Dartmouth, New Hampshire 03755, USA

-Thomas

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amygdala.jpgCan a brain scan reveal your relationship to your mother? According to a recent study, this may well be the case.

One of the theories in modern psychology is about the relationship between a child and her parent, especially the mother. Among such attachment theories is the original theory by John Bowlby. For a good description of attachment theory see Wikipedia. There’s also a good article (PDF) in Developmental Psychology on the history of attachment.
Basically, the theory of attachment demonstrated that the dyadic relationship between the infant and the mother can take the form of different styles — attachment styles. Such styles include secure attachment where the infant can use the mother as a secure base from which the immediate environment is explored. Insecure attachment, however, can come in different forms, including avoidant, ambivalent and disorganized (see also here). Studies have shown that the attachment style at birth is likely to influence the social functions in adulthood, and that the attachment style in one female is inherited by her offspring through a process called transmission (see also this excellent paper). Normally, this transmission is thought to be socially transmitted, although I think it’s a dubious conclusion since children are both genetically and socially related to their mother. However, a convincing study (PDF) in 2003 by Bokhorst showed that while genetic influence on temperament was relatively high, the influence on attatchment style was negligible.

But let’s get to the case: does attachment style demonstrate measurable effects on the brain? Indeed, this is what Erwin Lemche and colleagues found in a study using functional MRI. Based on previous findings that insecure attachment is related to heightened sympathetic nervous system activity (e.g. heart rate increase and cortisol secretion), Lemche et al. demonstrated that performance during a stress, relative to a neutral, prime stimulus condition involved bilateral amygdalae activation.

The subjects were shownn two series of 32 sentence statements describing self-centred or other-centred information. They had to report whether they agreed or disagreed with the statements by pressing a button. Before the presentation of the target sentences, subliminal messages with negative content were presented on some occasions (stress condition), or with nonsense sentence content (neutral condition). For example, the negative prime could be “My mom rejects me” presented for 30 milliseconds. In the neutral condition the prime could be “Ym umu jrecest em”, also presented for 30 milliseconds.

The activation of the amygdalae after negative primes was the same for all subjects. However, for those subjects who demonstrated an insecure attachment style (determined by the Adult Attachment Interview) the amygdalae activation levels was significantly higher when presented with the unconscious negative primes.

So having an insecure attachment style leads to higher activation to attachment-related primes. Taken together, this result demonstrates a role for amygdala in mediating attatchment relevant behaviour. Indeed, it is interesting to see how a phylogenetic “old” limbic structure is involved in an interpersonal psychological process, which is normally thought to involve more prefrontal cortical regions.

-Thomas

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Here is a great story: human imitation has been known to be present in newborns, supporting a notion of the human race being predisposed to social interaction. However, an obvious question of whether this is also the case in non-human primates below our closest evolutionary relatives has not been asked. Until now. In an excellent study by Pier Ferrari and colleagues in PLoS Biology, imitation of facial expression is demonstrated in neonatal monkeys (that disappeared after approx. 7 days).

From ScienceDaily we can read:

Ferrari et al. tested 21 baby rhesus monkeys’ response to various experimental conditions at different ages (one, three, seven, and 14 days old). Infants were held in front of a researcher who began with a passive expression (the baseline condition) and then made one of several gestures, including tongue protrusion, mouth opening, lip smacking, and hand opening.

Day-old infants rarely displayed mouth opening behavior, but smacked their lips frequently. When experimenters performed the mouth opening gesture, infants responded with increased lip smacking but did not increase any other behavior. None of the other stimuli produced significant responses. But by day 3, matched behaviors emerged: infants stuck out their tongues far more often in response to researchers’ tongue protrusions compared with control conditions, and smacked their lips far more often while watching researchers smacking theirs. By day 7, the monkeys tended to decrease lip smacking when humans performed the gesture, and by two weeks, all imitative behavior stopped.

Here is an example from the article:

And from the abstract:

Our findings provide a quantitative description of neonatal imitation in a nonhuman primate species and suggest that these imitative capacities, contrary to what was previously thought, are not unique to the ape and human lineage. We suggest that their evolutionary origins may be traced to affiliative gestures with communicative functions.

UPDATE: Jown Hawkes has an in-depth presentation and discussion of this study.

-Thomas

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gal507.jpgThe next International Imaging Genetics Conference is opening its doors now for registration. The third year in a row, building on two successful conferences, this third meeting will also house two separate workshops: one on brain imaging for geneticists; and one on genetics for brain imagers. All in the spirit of crossing the bridge between genetics, brain imaging and statistics. As this course was brilliant last year, I’m hoping to attend in January 2007, too.

Here is the announcement:

The First and Second International Imaging Genetics Conferences were held to bring together national and international experts in neuroimaging, genetics, data-mining, visualization and statistics. Targeting physicians and scientific researchers, this annual conference features presentations from investigators world-wide and held in-depth discussions within the emerging field of Imaging Genetics. Given the known importance of both genetics and environment in brain function, and the role of neuroimaging in revealing brain dysfunction, the synergism of integrating genetics with brain imaging will fundamentally change our understanding of human brain function in disease. To fully realize the promise of this synergy, we must develop novel analytic, statistical, and visualization techniques for this new field.

This international symposium was held to initially assess the state of the art in the various established fields of genetics and imaging, and to facilitate the transdisciplinary fusion needed to optimize the development of the emerging field of Imaging Genetics. The Third Annual International Imaging Genetics Conference will be held on January 15th and 16th, 2007 at the Beckman Center of the National Academy of Sciences in Irvine, CA. We look forward to seeing you at this exciting upcoming event.

Monday January 15th:

  • Nicholas Schork, UCSD “Multivariate Analysis of Combined Imaging and Genomic Data”
  • Eleazer Eskin, UCSD “Analysis of Complex Traits Through Intermediate Phenotypes.”
  • Tom Nichols, University of Michigan “Statistical Challenges & Opportunities in Imaging Genetics”
  • Fabio Macciardi, University of Toronto “Integrating Imaging Genetics Methods in Schizophrenia.”
  • David Goldman, NIAAA “Genes and Neurobiologies in the Addictions”
  • David Goldstein, Duke Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy “Neuropsychiatric pharmacogenetics”
  • Daniel Weinberger, NIMH/NIH: TBA

Tuesday January 16th:

  • Joseph Callicott, NIMH “Does risk for schizophrenia arise from multiple genes in vulnerable pathways? Evidence from DISC1 and FEZ1”
  • Lisa Eyler, UCSD “Genetics of Brain and Cognition: A Twin Study of Aging”
  • Fei Wang, Peking University “Neuregulin 1 Genetic Variation and anterior cingulum integrity in schizophrenia and in health.”
  • Andreas Meyer-Lindenberg, NIMH/NIH “Genetic characterization of prefrontal-subcortical interactions in humans.”

**New for 2007** Sunday January 14th:

*** Half-day Workshop tutorials will be offered the day before the conference at the Beckman Center- see website for details***

Workshop 1: What Geneticists need to know about Brain Imaging
Workshop 2: What Brain Imagers need to know about Genetics

Registration and conference information can be found at the conference website

-Thomas

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greatimage.jpgA core question in the study of personality and intelligence is about the relative contribution of inherited traits and learned behaviours. How much nature vs how much nurture shapes the mind? This problem can be approached in several ways, including the study of monozygotic twins that have been reared apart, and adoption studies (e.g. comparing the IQ of the biological vs. the adoptive parents to assess genetic vs. environmental effects respectively). However, on rare occasions we get the opportunity to study extreme cases of how nature and nurture influences the human mind. Such occasions include children that have grown up without (or with very little) influence from other people.

Such stories are at the same time shockingly disturbing and at the same time truly amazing, and they provide us with insights into the development of the human mind. It has demonstrated, for example, how there is a critical period for language acquisition.

What happens to a mind that is deprived from cultural influence during childhood? This is the ultimate test of the nature-nurture debate. But it is also the ultimate non-ethical experiment. Nevertheless, on rare occasions science has been provided with cases where children have been abandoned or seriously socially deprived. We don’t have to go father than last week’s story about Natascha Kampusch, the now 18 year old woman who was kidnapped eight years ago and kept in a cramped, windowless underground bedroom during her captivity, and isolated from interactions with any other human beings. Kampusch still had interaction with her kidnapper, but she has spent her entire adolescence in social isolation, a period of development that involves the development of social skills and personality.

In Boston Review, Rebecca Saxe who is an MIT psychologist, has an excellent review of Encounters with Wild Children by Adriana S. Benzaquén. The book is about the history of scientific studies of “wild children”, or as the publisher write:

Since the early seventeenth century, stories of encounters with strange children in unusual circumstances have been recorded, circulated, and reproduced in Europe and North America not simply as myths, legends, or good tabloid copy but as occurrences deserving serious scrutiny by philosophers and scientists. “Wild children” were seen as privileged objects of knowledge, believed to hold answers to fundamental questions about the boundaries of the human, the character and significance of civilization, and the relation between nature and culture, heredity and environment.

The study of these “wild children” have thus been thought of as a genuine path to study the influence of culture (or, rather, lack thereof) on the developing mind. But as Benzaquèn argues, we should not give these studies this high rank. As Saxe writes:

But here’s the catch: the forbidden experiment may belong to a smaller group of experimental problems that persistently seem meaningful but are not. Intuitively, we expect that while human nature interacts with human society in a typical child’s development, the natural and the social are in principle independent and distinguishable. If this intuition is wrong, the forbidden experiment is incoherent. In fact, the social and the natural may be irretrievably entangled in development. In part this is because a social environment that includes other human beings is inevitably more natural for a human infant than any wholly artificial environment that could be constructed to replace it. Even the unfolding of innately determined human traits relies on a social environment. For example, virtually every human infant is exposed to a language and learns it; an infant who was never exposed to any language could not possibly speak one. Yet it is the children who do learn a language—through social interactions—who illustrate the natural human capacity.

So although we might be interested in the psychological profile and story that may eventually come from the Natascha Kampusch story, it should definitely be taken with more than a grain of salt.

-Thomas

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alcohol.gifAdolescence is a period of dramatic transformation in the healthy human brain, leading to both regional and general brain volume changes. Recent high-resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) studies emphasize the effects of ongoing myelination, indicating a substantial maturation process (see Figure 1). The period of adolescence is often defined as spanning the second decade of life, although some researchers expand their definition of adolescence to include the early 20s as well. Research into brain maturation in adolescence is particularly important, given that it is normally considered the peak period of neural reorganization that contributes to normal variation in cognitive skills and personality Additionally, it is seen as the period of major mental illness onset, such as schizophrenia. Despite growing evidence for pronounced changes in both the structure and function of the brain during adolescence and early adulthood, few studies have explored this relationship directly using in vivo imaging methods. Thus, little is still known about the relationship between adolescent behaviour and outcomes, and maturational effects on morphological and functional aspects of the brain.

braindev_adolescence1.jpg

Figure 1Brain development during adolescence

The psychological and social changes of that occur during adolescence include a higher level or orientation towards and identification with peers, group socialism and personality consolidation. A main social behavioural change is the tendency to use alcohol and other stimulants. In European countries and especially Denmark, 60% of all adolescents report having had their first alcoholic whole drink before age 15, the majority reporting a debut at around age 12 (see Figure 2). Today, alcohol is considered a normal part of adolescent culture.

 

alcodebut.jpg

Figure 2Age of alcohol use debut, as measured by the first consumption of a full alcoholic unit. Note that the majority of debuts are around 12 years. Furthermore, note the relatively high number (8%) reporting a <9 year old debut. (x-axis numbers indicate age of reported first full drink of alcoholic beverage; “yngre end 9” = “younger than 9”; “jeg har ikke drukket” = “I have not yet tried alcohol”)

The effects of prolonged regular alcohol consumption in adults are today considered well documented. Studies of extreme cases such as Wernicke’s encephalopathy and foetal alcohol syndrome have shown that alcohol at critical periods or over time can have severe effects on significant modification and damage of brain structure, physiology and function. In adults, heavy alcohol consumption results in atrophy of grey and white matter, particularly in the frontal lobes, cerebellum, and limbic structures. Heavy drinking also raises the risk of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.

Adolescents tend to drink larger quantities on each drinking occasion that adults, possibly a combination of lower sensitivity to some of the unpleasant effects of intoxication and altered patterns of social interaction, including a willingness to indulge in more risky activities. However, it has been suggested that adolescents may be more sensitive to some of alcohol’s harmful effects on brain function. Research now suggests that, even over the shorter time frame of adolescence, drinking alcohol can harm the liver, bones, endocrine system, and brain, and interfere with normal growth. Studies in humans have found that alcohol can lower the levels of growth- and sex hormones in both adolescent genders.

Recent studies using animal models have demonstrated that the adolescent brain is even more sensitive to alcohol consumption. Alcohol inhibits normal neurogenesis, the process in which neurons are created. The magnitude of this effect has been related to the level of consumption; higher levels of consumption (e.g. binge consumption) had the most severe effects on the brain. Furthermore, alcohol impairs spatial memory function in adolescent animals more than adults, a result that is thought to be mediated by a larger inhibitory effect of alcohol on neural transmission in adolescence.

The long-term effects of alcohol consumption on brain maturation are yet poorly understood in human adolescence. Studies report that a history of high alcohol consumption in adolescence has been associated with reduced hippocampal volumes (see Figure 3), and with subtle white-matter microstructure abnormalities in the corpus callosum. In order to understand the effects of alcohol on the brain these findings must be compared to several factors pertaining to alcohol consumption in young adults, including 1) onset of alcohol use; 2) amount of alcohol consumed regularly; 3) type of alcohol consumption (regular use or binge drinking). In addition, a number of confounding factors need to be addressed and controlled between different study groups, including 1) general cognitive function; 2) the effects of gender and pubic stage; 3) gender-related preferences for alcoholic beverages; and 4) the effects of gene-related differences in neurotransmitter function.

adloescence_alcohol.jpg

Figure 3Hippocampus volume differences in adolescents with alcohol use disorder (AAU, right) compared to healthy adolescents (left). Volume estimation is corrected for general brain size.

So who says alcohol is not damaging? We know it is in adults. We know it is in prenatal development. Why not during adolescence? Even more so; during this period of brain development so much is happening; the continuation of brain development; pruning and consolidation of brain, cognition and personality; all combined with the coctail of changes resulting from hormonal changes. Add alcohol, and in heavy doses in binge drinking, and you’ve got a recipe for brain dysfunction and detrimental brain development.

In most cultures, alcohol is seen as acceptable, even for adolescents. Alcohol is possibly even more problematic in countries such as Denmark, since it is not illegal for children and adolescents to drink alcoholic beverages (although it is strangely enough illegal for them to buy it; i.e. they have to get it from their parents or another >15 year old). Statistically, Denmark ranges among the countries that has the earliest alcohol debut and the highest mean weekly/monthly alcohol consumption in adolescence. In general, alcohol is more socially and culturally accepted in the Western world (or all cultures?). But given that alcohol has such damaging effects should we allow it if it turns out to have detrimental effects on brain development and cognitive functions?

You can put it another way: given that you know this, would you allow your teenage son or daughter to drink alcohol? If you knew that her or his brain would respond negatively (both long and short term) to the alcohol, would you let it happen? Thick twice

-Thomas

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motherbrain1.jpgHaving a baby has a large impact on how we live our lives (trust me). But whereas men may react with amazement, wonder, even jealousy of being left aside, little actually happens to our bodies after birth. The changes that happen in women are far more obvious, not only during pregnancy but after birth also. The production of milk, and the possibility of conditional learning of milk production to the child’s crying is just one example of how body, brain and mind get tuned into caretaking.

Furthermore, studies of oxytocin, a mammalian hormone that acts as a neurotransmitter in the brain, has been implicated in the bonding of the mother-infant attachment bond. Oxytocin is present in both sexes and is thought to be involved in social bonding, stress-reduction and orgasm, just to mention some. but the hormone seems to play a specific role in how mothers react to their newborns, and the establishment of a sound dyadic attachment. In this way, the brains of mothers change, both as a result of hormonal expression (loads of additional oxytocin) and the social interaction with the infant.

But did you know that some of the neurons in mothers’ brains actually stem from their babies? In other words: some of a mother’s brain cells are actually from the offspring.

This is just what a team of researchers from Singapore have found and published in the journal Stem Cells. It’s well known in this literature that fetal cells can enter the blood of circulation during pregnancy and remain there for many years after birth. These cells can, just as regular stem cells, develop into different kinds of tissue, including bone marrow, liver an spleen cells. But whether these cells can cross the blood-brain barrier has been less certain.

stemcell.jpg

The expression of fetal stem cells in the mother’s cortex at 4 months after birth. Figure 1-H from the article.

This is exactly what the researchers found. By labelling fetal stem cells they discovered that these cells had indeed crossed the blood-brain barrier and moved into the brain. Furthermore, at measurement four days after pregnancy these cells had developed into neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes or macrophage-like cells. In other words, they developed just as any other stem cell.

So babies gets into their mothers’ minds in more than through hormonal and psychological mechanisms.

However, what is actually the function of these neurons is more unclear. Does the workings of fetal neurons have any significance for their relationship, or any particular mental function in mothers? This is indeed an opening field, and an eye-opener to many people (including myself when I first read it). No results have been reported in either direction as of yet.

What has been studied, however, is how these fetal stem cells can actually play a supporting role in the mother’s brain in the case of pathology. In addition to documenting that fetal stem cells enter the mother’s brain, the researchers added a condition involving brain lesion of the mother’s brain. What they found was just as surprising: after a lesion to the brain, more fetal cells were found in the lesioned region. So the baby’s cells seem tuned into helping the mother regain herself in the case of injury.
Mind-blowing as this finding may be, little is still known about this phenomenon. The development, mechanism, function and evolution of this process is just beginning to be explored. But it already raises a whole range of questions: can we measure a difference between mother’s and “non-mother’s” brains, both structurally and functionally? Does this “fetomaternal microchimerism” lead to any advantages (i.e. survival) in mothers? What is the range of variation in this kind of expression: are there “good” and “bad” fetuses? Are mothers of many children better off in any respect of those with fewer children? Or is this process just a question of striking the energy balance, the child “paying back” what it deprived the mother of during pregnagcy?

So a portion of yourself resides somewhere in your mother’s brain (and body). Children are indeed the result of their parents, but now it seems that children pay back, too.

-Thomas

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icon_psychoanalysis.jpgToday we received this nice email from Paul Watson at Psychology Press. They are launching a new site for cognitive neuroscience news. I’ll let the email speak for itself:

Hi Martin & Thomas

Just a quick note to say we’ve recently launched a new Cognitive Neuroscience Arena which I think might be of interest to you two.

(We = Psychology Press, publishers of the journal Social Neuroscience, which you commented on in your blog post on July 4th)

We’ve included a link to the Brain Ethics blog on our blogs page.

As well as all our relevant books and journals, we’ve included a few other features that may be of interest to you and your readers:

1. The whole of the first chapter of our textbook “The Student’s Guide to Cognitive Neuroscience” is available to read free online (we think it’s a great introduction to the subject)

2. In a similar vein, we’ve also got the introductory article from our journal Social Neuroscience, also available to read free online (this is the same one which is on the Social Neuroscience journal website which you posted about).

3. There’s also a page of links to the latest Cognitive Neuroscience blog posts (courtesy of Technorati)

4. An a nifty GoogleMap showing forthcoming Cogntitive Neuroscience conferences (only 3 we know of at time of writing) at http://www.cognitiveneurosciencearena.com/resources/conferences.asp

And numerous other features including an RSS feed of our latest Cogntive Neuroscience books.

I’ve sent the link to your blog to Rose Allet who runs the marketing for the Social Neuroscience journal here at Psychology Press, so she may also email you and will probably send the URL of your blog to the editors of Social Neuroscience so they can see your comments).

If you’ve got any questions, feel free to drop me a line.

Regards,

Paul Watson

———————————————————————————-
Paul Watson, Senior E-Marketing Executive
Psychology Press

http://www.psypress.co.uk
http://www.routledgementalhealth.co.uk

-Thomas

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